Rivkah Holland
Rivkah Holland
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  San Antonio, TX
  Joined April 21, 2017
Rivkah is an Administrator and English instructor at Assemble-Together eCampus. She has homeschooled her five children for the past fifteen years while...

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Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @jeffrey-siegel's Timeline
14 hours ago
The 210th mitzvah is that we are commanded to honor our parents.

The source of this commandment is G‑d's statement1 (exalted be He), "Honor your father and your mother."

The details of this mitzvah are explained in many Talmudic passages, mostly and primarily in tractate Kiddushin.2

The Sifra3 says, "What constitutes 'honor'? To give them food and drink, to clothe and cover them, to bring them inside and take them outside."
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Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @jeffrey-siegel's Timeline
14 hours ago
The 209th mitzvah is that we are commanded to honor the Sages1 and to stand up before them as a sign of respect.

The source of this commandment is G‑d's statement (exalted be He),2 "Stand up before the elderly, and give respect to the old."(The Oral Torah understands the word "old" in this context as meaning those with great wisdom and learning, although we must also honor those who are old literally-J.S.)

The Sifra3 says, "The words, 'stand up' and 'give respect' [when taken together] teach you to stand up when it shows respect."4

The details of this mitzvah have been explained in the first chapter of Kidushin.5

You should be aware that although this is a general obligation on everyone to honor the Sages, and even one Sage to another equal to him in stature, as explained in the statement,6 "The Sages in Bavel stand up one before the other"; nevertheless there is a special additional requirement for a student, i.e. that the honor that a student must show his teacher is much greater than the honor he must show another Sage.

In addition to honoring your teacher you must revere7 him, since it is already explained that your obligation to your teacher is even greater than that to your father, whom Scripture obligates you to honor and revere.8 Our Sages said explicitly,9 "Between [honoring] his father and his teacher, his teacher comes first."

The Sages have already explained10 that it is forbidden for a student to dispute his teacher, i.e. to reject his authority, to give separate interpretations, and to teach or issue rulings without his permission. It is forbidden for him to argue with him, or speak angrily to him, or to judge him harshly, i.e. to give any kind of [non-literal11] explanation to his action or speech, since it is possible that this was not his intention.

Our Sages said in the Talmudic chapter "HaChelek",12 "Anyone who goes against his teacher is as if he went against the Divine Presence., as it is written13 [regarding Korach], 'when they rebelled against G‑d,'"; "Anyone who makes a dispute against his teacher is as if he made a dispute against the Divine Presence, as it is written,14 'These are the Waters of Dispute where the Israelites disputed with G‑d'"; "Anyone who speaks against his teacher is as if he speaks against the Divine Presence, as it is written,15 'Your complaints are not against us but against G‑d'"; and "Anyone who has second thoughts about his teacher is as if he had second thoughts about the Divine Presence, as it is written,16 'The people spoke out against G‑d and Moses.'" All this is clear, since the rebellion of Korach, and the dispute, complaints and wicked thoughts17 of the Jewish people were against Moses, leader of the entire Jewish people, yet Scripture considers each of them to have been committed against G‑d. Our Sages said explicitly,18 "You should fear your teacher as you fear G‑d."

All this19 is derived from the Scripture's command of honoring our Sages and our parents, rather than counting as a separate commandment,20 as explained in the Talmudic text.
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Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @jeffrey-siegel's Timeline
14 hours ago
The 208th mitzvah is that we are commanded to have accurate weights, scales, and measures, and to insure that they are exact.

The source of this commandment is G‑d's statement1 (exalted be He), "You must have an honest balance, honest weights, an honest eifa, and an honest hin."

In the words of the Sifra: "The phrase 'an honest balance' means that you must insure that the balances are totally accurate. 'Honest weights' means that you must insure that the weights are totally accurate. 'An honest eifa' means that you must insure that all eifas are totally accurate. 'An honest hin' means that you must insure that all hins are totally accurate." You are already aware that an eifa is a dry measure and a hin is a liquid measure.

Although2 the actual type of measure varies, they serve a single function, since what is weighed or measured is just a particular quantity of something. All these categories, i.e. scales, weights, and dry and liquid measures are collectively called middot. So too, the commandment to insure that each corresponds exactly to the commonly accepted amount is called mitzvat middot.

In the words of the Sifra: "On this condition I brought you out of Egypt — on condition that you accept upon yourselves mitzvat middot; because whoever acknowledges mitzvat middot acknowledges the redemption from Egypt and whoever denies mitzvat middot denies the redemption from Egypt."

The details of this mitzvah are explained in the 5th chapter of tractate Bava Batra.3
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Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @judy-howard's Timeline
14 hours ago
Boker Tov family, I am finally starting to feel as though I will live to serve HaShem another day!!!!! My doctor and I are going to have a very long talk when I get home which will be the 28th. I tried really hard to put into practice what we learned in LM lesson 6 and 12 but that is a discipline I have not mastered. I wanted to praise HaShem for every ache and pain, for the sickness inside my stomach and the massive headache for 6 days. I thanked HaShem a few times but honestly, I felt sorry for myself more. To live in acceptance of everything that happens is truly a discipline and unnatural. I would think about it and then roll over and cry. So I suppose, I failed the test. Next time maybe. Now that I am sitting up and getting ready to listen to Hebrew lesson 6, how is everyone? How are all of our new friends. Live, Love, Learn is the goal this week.
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Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @jeffrey-siegel's Timeline
14 hours ago
The 211th mitzvah is that we are commanded to fear our parents. We should think of them as we do of someone who people fear, and who is able to administer punishment,1 such as a king; and act towards them as we do with someone we fear can do us harm.

The source of this commandment is G‑d's statement2 (exalted be He), "A person shall fear his mother and his father."

The Sifra3 says, "What constitutes 'fear'? Not to sit in their seat, not to speak instead of them, and not to contradict them."

The details of this mitzvah are also explained in tractate Kiddushin.4
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Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @eliyanah-jordan-yarden's Timeline
3 days ago
@judy-howard So good to see you today. I hope you feel better soon. Rest well.
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Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @eliyanah-jordan-yarden's Timeline
3 days ago
My blog update is going to be late. I am so sorry, please forgive me... I am half done typing it... and it is coming. Mondayish
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rivkahh
@rivkah-holland is now following @chofetz-chaim
3 days ago
Joined 2 years ago

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