Rivkah Holland
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Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @jeffrey-siegel's Timeline
4 days ago
The 236th prohibition is that the borrower is also forbidden from borrowing with interest.

If not for this prohibition on the borrower to borrow with interest, one might think that only the lender transgresses, since he is the wrongdoer; not the borrower, since he merely allows himself to be overcharged. This would be similar to ona'a,1 which applies only to the one who overcharges, not the one who pays. It was therefore necessary to have a separate prohibition that the borrower shall not borrow money with interest.

The source of this prohibition is G‑d's statement2 (exalted be He), "Do not deduct interest from your brother, whether it is interest for money, interest for food,..."

The Oral Torah explains [that this phrase should be read,] "Do not allow to be deducted from your brother..." [therefore applying to the borrower, not the lender]. Our Sages stated explicitly in tractate Bava Metzia: "A borrower transgresses 'Do not deduct' and3 'Do not place a stumbling block before the blind,' " as explained in our discussion of that mitzvah.4
Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @jeffrey-siegel's Timeline
4 days ago
The 237th prohibition is that we are forbidden from being involved between the borrower and the lender in a loan with interest. We cannot act as guarantor for either one of them, testify for them, or write a document for them regarding their agreement involving interest.

The source of this prohibition is G‑d's statement1 (exalted be He), "Do not place interest upon him." In the words of tractate Bava Metzia:2 "The guarantor and witnesses only transgress the prohibition, 'Do not place interest upon him.' " There it is explained that the scribe has the same status as the guarantor and witnesses.

It is also explained there that this prohibition, "Do not place interest upon him" — although it refers to the intermediaries — also includes the lender. Therefore, one who lends money with interest transgresses six prohibitions:

1) "Do not press him for repayment."3

2) "Do not make him pay interest (neshech) for your money."4

3) "Do not make him pay interest (marbit) for your food."5

4) "Do not take interest from him."6

5) "Do not place interest upon him."7

6) "Do not place a stumbling block before the blind."8

Our Sages said there that: "The following transgress prohibitions: the lender, the borrower, the guarantor, and the witnesses. The Sages said: 'The scribe too.' They transgress 'do not make him pay,' 'do not take,' 'do not press him,' 'do not place,' and 'Do not place a stumbling block before the blind.' " Abaye said in the Gemara, "The lender transgresses all of them; the borrower — 'do not deduct' and 'do not place a stumbling block before the blind'; the guarantor and witnesses — 'do not place interest upon him.' "

When one transgresses this prohibition9 — if it is ribit k'tzutza (interest by Torah law) — the interest is taken away and given back to the one who paid it.
Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @jeffrey-siegel's Timeline
4 days ago
The 238th prohibition is that we are forbidden from withholding and delaying payment of a hired worker's wages.

The source of this prohibition is G‑d's statement1 (exalted be He), "Do not let a worker's wages remain with you overnight until morning."

When does this verse apply? If he is a day worker he collects his wages the following night, as the verse says, "until morning." If he is a night worker he collects his wages during that night or the following day. He must receive his wages by the time the sun sets, as it is written,2 "You must give him his wage on the day it is due, and not let the sun set with him waiting for it."

In the words of the Mishneh3: "A day worker can collect his wages the following night and that a night worker can collect his wages the following day."

They4 do not count as two mitzvos, but are rather two prohibitive statements that complete one mitzvah, i.e. from these two prohibitive statements we know when he must be paid.

The details of this mitzvah are explained in the 9th chapter of tractate Bava Metzia. There it is explained that this prohibition applies only to a hired worker who is Jewish — that if one delays paying him, he transgresses the prohibition. However, if the worker is not Jewish,5 one violates only the positive commandment6 "You must give him his wage on the day it is due."
Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @jo-howell's Timeline
4 weeks ago
Would appreciate a few prayers lifted on my behalf tomorrow as I undergo an angiogram to see what's causing my chest pains and fatigue. Might keep David in those prayers, too, as he will have a lot of time to wait for answers. Thanks to my family and friends on A-T for your continued support.
Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @jeffrey-siegel's Timeline
4 weeks ago
The 219th prohibition is that we are forbidden to prevent an animal from eating from the produce it is working with as it works. If, for example, it is treading grain or carrying straw on its back, one may not prevent it from eating from the grain or straw.

The source of this prohibition is G‑d's statement,1 "Do not muzzle an ox when it is treading grain."

It is explained2 that the verse [says "ox" rather than "animal" because it] refers to the most common case, but one may not muzzle an ox nor any other animal. So too, one may not prevent it from eating the food as it works whether it is treading or doing another type of work. One who does so is punished by lashes, even if done only verbally.3

The details of this mitzvah are explained in the 7th chapter of tractate Bava Metzia.
Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @bayli-brewer's Timeline
one month ago
Something seems fishy here ...
Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @bayli-brewer's Timeline
one month ago
"Our next big shocker …"
Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @bayli-brewer's Timeline
one month ago
Using medications on Shabbat … a very insightful read!!
Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @jeffrey-siegel's Timeline
one month ago
The 216th prohibition is that we are forbidden from planting grain or vegetables in a vineyard. This type of mixture is called kilai ha'kerem (kilayim in a vineyard).

The source of this commandment is G‑d's statement,1 "Do not plant your vineyard with kilayim."

In the words of the Sifri: "Why do we need the verse, 'Do not plant your vineyard with kilayim'? It already is written, 'Do not plant your field with kilayim,' which certainly includes both [kilayim in] a vineyard and a field!"

They answer, "This verse comes to teach that anyone who allows kilayim in a vineyard transgresses two prohibitions."2

You should be aware that kilai ha'kerem is prohibited by Torah law only in Eretz Yisrael. One who plants wheat, barley, and grapes in the same handful, and in Eretz Yisrael, is punished by lashes.

Outside Eretz Yisrael, this planting is forbidden by Rabbinic law and one who plants wheat, barley, and grapes in the same handful receives lashes by Rabbinic decree.

Grafting together trees [of different species], however, is [prohibited by Torah law and] punishable by lashes everywhere [‑both in Eretz Yisrael and outside Eretz Yisrael]. This prohibition is included in the general statement, "Do not plant your field with kilayim."3

The details of this mitzvah are also explained in tractate Kilayim.
Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @jo-howell's Timeline
one month ago
Preparation time for Shabbat again. I've spent some time today doing a "homework" assignment give to us by Clear for the King and Prophets class. If there are others of you out there who would like to learn along with us, the class meets on Tuesdays at 5:30pm CDT. We're studying chronologically which really helps "connect the dots" along the way. It's a great class. How about giving it a try :-)
Rivkah Holland
@rivkah-holland Liked @clear-brewer's Timeline
2 months ago
SHABBAT SHALOM!!!!